My Top Five Dahlias - Sally Moore

My 5 Top Favourite Dahlias - Sally Moore

Dahlia enthusiast and grower Sally Moore of Plants from BA9 grows over 80 varieties of dahlias on her small plot in rural Somerset where she also specialises in tubers, runs workshops, and provides buckets of cut dahlias to local florists for spectacular Autumn displays.

If there is one plant I cannot be without, it is the dahlia. Can you think of another genus that flowers so very freely, for so very long?” says Sally  “It’s almost impossible to narrow down my favourites - how do you begin to pick just a handful? - so I thought I would share my top five types of dahlias that I will be cutting and bringing indoors this week.”

This selection individually are beautiful, with very different appearances from each other, but all together they combine to create a hot explosion of colour and mouth-watering glory.

Jowey Mirella

is a ball dahlia in the deepest maroon, almost black. The utter simplicity of the flower is beguiling – it’s a brilliant example of the Fibonacci sequence at play in your own garden. This variety grows strongly on long straight stems and lasts extremely well in the vase. Once at mature size, you’ll occasionally spot a solitary bee taking a well-earned nap in one of the petals.

Jowey Mirella

Penhill Watermelon

falls into the category of a dinner plate dahlia, bred to achieve staggering diameter of flower head. If cajoled correctly (a topic for another post!) the flower heads can reach nearly a foot across and easily eclipse an adult human head! Beautiful in every stage from a newly-opening bud to a triumphant fanfare of a fully mature flower, the colours ripple like quiet flames in shades of peaches and pink.

Penhill Watermelon

Perch Hill

is a cracking decorative dahlia that simply gets on with the job in hand. Long stems, good in the vase, she pairs beautifully with so many other varieties.

Perch Hill

Myrtle’s Folly

is a head-turner. Look at the detail on the ends of each petal; called fimbriation, this ragged effect lifts her into another realm. She is a firework of raspberry ripple shot through with orange juice. If she were a drink, she would certainly be a cocktail!

Myrtle's Folly

Labyrinth

is one of my must-haves every year. Hard to beat that combination of longer, petals that twist and turn in hot shades of apricot, pink and salmon. The plant has green foliage in a darker shade than typical which contrast beautifully with the flowers.

Labyrinth

 

For more information about Sally Moore and Plants from BA9 you can head on over to their Facebook page, where you can see which varieties are being grown, hints and tips, get advice or inspiration and you can share gardening insights with others through their Facebook group


With all these types of dahlias, you can make a real explosion of colours in your garden. If you are looking for more inspiration for late summer or autumn colour in your garden see - Our Best Picks for Late Summer Colour